Driving Past Denali to Go Pet Reindeer, Alaska Part VII

Alaska Part VII , trip day 5; July 6, 2018750_3840After our fabulous day of hiking through the rain in Denali, we woke up for our final morning in Denali and packed up for our drive back to Wasilla. Two full days in Denali simply wasn’t enough, but we had so much else to see during our trip. Breakfast consisted of our now standard bacon, eggs, toast and coffee/milk. Brinn helped me to knock out our breakfast dishes and prep some sandwiches for our long drive ahead. We loaded down the  Sequoia and pulled away from Denali Outdoor Center for the final time, and decided that we couldn’t drive straight through without one last stop in the park.

750_3657Gary agreed to a short stop by the visitor center and decided to stay behind and rest while Brinn, Ian, and I set out for a quick hike back down to Riley Creek. We started on the McKinley Station trail again, but quickly cut down a side trail to go straight to the water. Like the day before, we passed piles and piles of moose poop everywhere. No bear threatened our quick jaunt, and we returned to the parking lot within two hours to resume our journey south.

Along the drive, we began discussing our options for the day’s entertainment. We were 750_3880travelling to Wasilla in order to break up our long drive to the Kenai peninsula, but we’d already spent some time in Wasilla on our first day in Alaska. We’d seen the places we wanted to see there, but with all the daylight, we’d have plenty of day to fit in activity. A quick shuffle through the many brochures we’d picked up earlier in the week presented some ideas, and we decided to cut over to Palmer to visit the reindeer farm. A friend of Brinn’s had told us about visiting this farm with his wife on their trip to Alaska, so it seemed like a solid choice.

750_3881To reach The Reindeer Farm, we drove through south on Alaska 3, then jumped on Alaska 1. It was a bit different to have so few highways that all had such low numbers, but it sure did make directions easy. Like everywhere else we traveled, the views on the drive were stunning. Once we reached Palmer, we drove past the Alaska State Fairground. We continued driving through the Matanuska-Susitna Valley and decided this is an area we could easily see ourselves living in. Cell signal was strong here, there were plenty of shopping/dining options, the mountain views were spectacular, and the weather seemed ideal.  The fair ground could provide regular entertainment along with the many outdoor options.

 

Pulling in at the reindeer farm, we quickly discovered many other animals in residence. 750_3836Some cute quarter horses stood patiently in their pens munching on hay while waiting for trail riders to rent them out. Ian didn’t immediately discover the rabbit in his hutch, but he sure did spot the chicken coop. We fly all the way to Alaska, drove thousands of miles to see native animals and stunning landscapes, and Ian showed more enthusiasm to snuggle with a chicken than anything else. 750_3850At least he’s consistent… We paid our $40 admission fee for the four of us, then we began our tour with the many skulls on display. After an anatomy lesson and some background information about the farm, our guide took us out into the reindeer pen where we were quickly badgered by quivering lips for the grain we received with our admission.

The farm keeps the reindeer in a large paddock together and allow guests to come right 750_3861inside with the deer. We learned all about the cycle of horn growth including velvet, hardening, and shedding. All the deer were in velvet as we were there in early July, and they were extremely touchy about their antlers. I assumed that they would be itchy as they shed their velvet, but our guide explained that in fact the shedding velvet actually made the horns very sensitive. All the deer were still shedding out their shaggy winter coats, and loved back scratches. Ian had trouble escaping some hungry deer as he was right at their level for grain thieving. Understandably, he preferred hanging out with the babies.

750_3902After we hung out with the deer and fed out all of our goodies, the tour moved us next to meet Rocky the moose. Rocky was a rescue that the Department of Fish and Game had rehomed with the reindeer farm as a baby. We got to meet him during his lanky “teenager” phase. The farm provided us with fresh-cut tree branches to feed Rocky, and Ian soon found himself in a tug of war match with a Moose who easily outweighed him about 15 times over.

After chatting with Rocky, we moved on down to meet some elk. They also enjoyed 750_3918stripping the leaves off of tree branches, and eagerly crowded the fence to snatch bites. We weren’t allowed inside the pens with the moose and elk like we were with the reindeer, but we were still able to get some pats and scratches through the fencing.  Once we finished with the elk, our tour was over, and we were allowed to wander around the farm at our leisure. This is when Ian found the chicken coop and quickly gained permission to enter it and sneak in some chicken cuddles. He tried to cuddle with the rabbit a bit, but he wasn’t quite as enthused as the chickens were.

750_3924Once we pulled Ian out of the chicken coop and we all had a good scrub, we loaded back up into the Sequoia in search of food. After a quick google survey of our options, we ended up at the Noisy Goose Cafe. I loved this place! I’m not sure that my dad was quite taken with it, but I also ordered a bit more simply than he did. He and Brinn ordered fish most places we went, which I get (when in Rome…), but as a non-fish eater, I tended to order whatever I was feeling for the day. On this day I

Pie

Image taken from foursquare.com

went with a bowl of chili and split a piece of chocolate pie with Ian. The pie case at this place bowled me over. So many options! Brinn enjoyed a giant slice of pecan pie, his favorite, while my dad dug into a big wedge of strawberry rhubarb. Rhubarb seems to be the plant of choice in Alaska. We encountered rhubarb pie many places. After cramming down as much pie as we cold, we finally drug ourselves back outside to backtrack to Wasilla, our final destination for the evening. So once again, we wrapped up another incredibly long day filled with multiple destinations and experiences.

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About ashleekiser

“For in Calormen, story-telling (whether the stories are true or made up) is a thing you're taught, just as English boys and girls are taught essay-writing. The difference is that people want to hear the stories, whereas I never heard of anyone who wanted to read the essays.” ― C.S. Lewis, The Horse and His Boy Join us on our family adventures as I try to tell our stories rather than bore you with more online essays.
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2 Responses to Driving Past Denali to Go Pet Reindeer, Alaska Part VII

  1. Sartenada says:

    Very interesting photos. In Finland we have reindeers and reindeer rides for families – free of course:

    Winter fun for children1

    Winter fun for children2

    Have a wonderful weekend!

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